New Book Club! Forever Young Adult

Fountaindale is excited to announce the start of a new book club in March of 2017! “Forever Young Adult” is a book club for those 18 and older who love to read Young Adult Literature!

Many of us know that Young Adult Literature is definitely NOT just for young adults! Loved Harry Potter? The Hunger Games? Even Twilight? (If so, that’s okay, we won’t tell anyone!) Or maybe you are a John Green buff who read The Fault in Our Stars the day it came out. Or maybe you haven’t read a YA book in your life but are curious as to what all the fuss is about! From super-fans to causal readers to newbies, this club is for YOU.

Young Adult literature might be easier to read than adult fiction, but as a genre, it is known for its creative, out-of-the-box concepts, emotional resonance, and memorable characters. This is why so many adults enjoy reading “YA” lit. Where else can you find books entirely written as case files or love letters to someone long dead? New and innovative ways of storytelling are being published in YA all the time – even genres like nonfiction and poetry are gaining ground in YA. The Forever Young Adult book club plans to explore the latest hits in the YA genre and participate in engaging discussions about the texts we read.

eleanor & park

First up for the new book club is our March read: Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell. Rainbow Rowell has become one of the biggest names in YA over the last few years, and Eleanor & Park is arguably her best YA novel. Here is a brief synopsis:

Two misfits.
One extraordinary love.

Eleanor… Red hair, wrong clothes. Standing behind him until he turns his head. Lying beside him until he wakes up. Making everyone else seem drabber and flatter and never good enough…Eleanor.

Park… He knows she’ll love a song before he plays it for her. He laughs at her jokes before she ever gets to the punch line. There’s a place on his chest, just below his throat, that makes her want to keep promises…Park.

Set over the course of one school year, this is the story of two star-crossed sixteen-year-olds—smart enough to know that first love almost never lasts, but brave and desperate enough to try.

Even if you absolutely will never be caught dead with a love story, this book will surprise you. Far from ooey-gooey romance, the book is filled with witty quips and awesome 80s references. It’s funny, poignant, and adorable all at the same time.

The Forever Young Adult Book Club will meet every 2nd Wednesday of the month at 7 p.m. in the Board Room, starting with our first meeting on March 8th. No registration is necessary! To reserve your copy of Eleanor & Park, you can call Adult and Teen Services at 630-685-4176 or visit the 3rd Floor Reference Desk!

Great Reads Book Club – January’s Book

6606456Great Reads Book Club kicked off the New Year with Nancy Pickard’s The Scent of Rain and Lightning. Apart from one person, who did not like anything about the book, everyone enjoyed Pickard’s mystery. While the majority liked the book, there was a uniform consensus that the final 20 to 30 pages could have been better plotted and better written. Unfortunately, a poorly-written conclusion muddles an enjoyable reading experience.

The most impressive aspect about Nancy Pickard’s The Scent of Rain and Lightning is its setting. According to the author, an idea for the story was born from the landscape. Pickard saw a photograph of Monument Rocks in Gove County, Kansas and was, according to her own words, ‘blown away’.

A small, fictional town of Rose is unpredictable. There are tornadoes, ice storms, bad economy and unresolved mysteries. When Jody Linder was 3 her father was murdered and her mother disappeared. A local drunkard and suspected wife beater Billy Crosby is arrested and imprisoned for committing the crime. Billy tries to convince everyone that he did not kill Jody’s father, but it is a word of an unpredictable, self-destructing man versus an overwhelming majority of a ‘decent’ community. 23 years later Billy’s sentence is commuted and he is released from jail. Billy’s early release unleashes an erratic chain of events; an incident that changes lives of nearly everyone living in Rose.

The Scent of Rain and Lightning has a few plot holes but that should not stop potential readers from picking this book up. The story is engaging and, as I have mentioned previously, the small town setting is believable and engrossing. Rural Kansas comes alive through Pickard’s writing. If you prefer a great sense of place over mystery , I definitely recommend this book. A movie adaptation starring Justin Chatwin (Shameless, War of the Worlds) will be released in 2017.

-Ilya

 

50 Book Challenge 2017

goodreads2107

Happy 2017! Is one of your resolutions this year to read more books? If so, I encourage you to join the 50 book challenge!

The 50 book challenge is just as it sounds – to read 50 books in one year. The most popular way to participate in this challenge is through Goodreads.com. Goodreads is a great tool for keeping track of what you read on a yearly, or even daily, basis. It allows you to build bookshelves of books you plan to read, books you have read, books you’re currently reading, books about dogs, books you loved as a kid – literally anything! And it has a built-in reading challenge that tracks how many books you read each year.

Does 50 sound like too much for you? No worries! You can adjust your challenge to however many books you want – 10, 20, 42, 142, you name it. Goodreads will tell you how far along you are, if you are on schedule, ahead of schedule, or behind, and the exact number of books you are ahead or behind. It’s the perfect way to keep track of your reading.

We are already 9 days in to 2016, so you might have to pick up some shorter books to get an early boost! Here are some titles I recommend to get you started on the 2017 50 book challenge:

A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness – this is an award-winning young adult book that is well-suited for older ages, too. The movie recently came out in theaters, so if you want to read it before you see it, this is a good choice for your first 2017 book!

a_monster_calls

A Series of Unfortunate Events by Lemony Snicket – this 13-book series will be a huge boost to your book count. A series for younger readers, it will make you laugh out loud, whatever your age. Then once you finish (it won’t take you long), you can check out the new Netflix series based on the books!

a series of unfortunate events books

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald – if you’re resolved to read more classics this year (maybe books you feel bad you haven’t read yet!), this is a great choice because it is less than 200 pages long!

thegreatgatsby

Slade House by David Mitchell – if you like horror, this is a good, short read for the start of 2017. It’s a group of inter-connected short stories that make a unique page-turner, both scary and entertaining!

slade house

March series by John Lewis – this is a series of 3 graphic novels written by congressman John Lewis about his experience during the Civil Rights movement. They are quick reads, but thought-provoking and historical, once again proving that graphic novels are not just comic books!

march-books-1-3-covers

Hector and the Search for Happiness by Francois Lelord – I’m noticing a more serious and/or dark pattern to this reading list, so I’ll throw in a happier one! This short novel follows Hector as he journeys around the world learning about what makes different people happy.

hector-and-the-search-for-happiness

Big Magic: Creative Living Beyond Fear by Elizabeth Gilbert – this one is a longer read than the others, but I wanted to include it because it is a great read for anyone wanting to step-up their creativity in the new year and find some inspiration to get going!

big magic

Good luck! May your 2017 be filled with books!

-Emily

Return to the Wizarding World!

fantastic-beasts-hp-sm

Have you heard? Audiences are returning to J.K. Rowling’s Wizarding World with the release of the new movie Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them on November 18th! With an original screenplay written by Rowling herself, the film follows magizoologist Newt Scamander, author of the famed textbook “Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them” used by Harry and his friends at Hogwarts. But before Newt wrote his book, he was just a lost wizard, kicked out of Hogwarts and wandering the streets of New York City with a suitcase full of magical creatures. A suitcase that opens…and lets the beasts loose on New York! The film looks to be a more “grown-up” version of the magical world we know, rife with political struggles between witches and Muggles in the days of prohibition.

We are so excited to return to the magic, and at Fountaindale, we are celebrating! On November 12th from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Fountaindale will be converting to 1920s Wizarding NYC! Join us for some flapper-themed magical fun, including a photo booth, wizard treats, real-life beasts, scavenger hunts, and more! Here’s the full schedule:

All Day

  • Fantastic Beasts 1920s Street Photo Area
  • Origami and coloring sheets

10:00 a.m.– Noon

  • Fantastic Beasts Animal Experience—Meet amazing creatures of all shapes and sizes!

10:00 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

  • Make Your Own Wand Craft
    • Create magical wand creations with washi tape!
  • MACUSA Wand Registration
  • Creature Maze
  • Wizard Emporium
  • Find the Fantastic Beasts Creature Scavenger Hunt Challenge

11:00 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

  • Experimental Creatures Lab—Bristle Bots

1:00–2:00 p.m.

  • Center Stage Players present Your Favorite Scenes from Harry Potter

2:00–4:00 p.m.

  • Studio 300’s Have You Seen This Wizard Poster Shoot
    • Come in for an interactive photo inspired by the wizarding world!
  • Make Your Own Wand Craft
  • MACUSA Wand Registration
  • Creature Maze
  • Wizard Emporium
  • Find the Fantastic Beasts Creature Scavenger Hunt Challenge

…and Brooks Café has a special wizard menu of Butterbeer, Pick-Me-Up Potions, Chocolate Frogs, and more!

The Friends of Fountaindale Book Cellar will be open 10 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

This is an all-ages, no-registration event – so stop by to discover the magic!

Here are some photos of what we’ve been working on to get prepared:

Great Reads Book Club – September’s Book

omw0510Old Man’s War by John Scalzi was a step outside of what the Great Reads Book Club usually reads. Most people in our discussion group thought the book was “clever, engaging and filled with interesting concepts.” The book explores what happens when a 75-year old man decides to transfer his consciousness into a genetically enhanced, 25 year-old body and joins the Colonial Defense Force in a war effort against alien species. And, of course, what happens is not pretty.

Why would our protagonist John Perry decide to join a war that is almost certainly going to kill him? Well, the love of his life Kathy passes away and, with an aged body, there is just not much left for John to live for on Earth anymore. After visiting his deceased wife’s grave, John’s leaves the planet and his adventure begins. Old Man’s War is packed with action, cool scientific concepts and different alien species.

There was one important problem with Old Man’s War. The majority of characters in the book are old people, and yet all of them, without exception, talk and act like teenagers. In short – this is a missed opportunity. Old people are interesting because they have years and years of experience, wisdom, memories and knowledge under their belt. Unfortunately, these characteristics are only mentioned passingly and don’t play a meaningful part in the story. Additionally, the story’s premise was so promising: “75 year old man transfers his consciousness into a genetically enhanced, 25 year-old body and joins the army.” Ideas on ethics and philosophy could have been explored in greater detail here. Instead, we have a military space shooter that’s primarily interested in entertaining the reader, not making her think.

When it’s all said and done, Old Man’s War is a decent book. It’s entertaining and, at times, very funny. If you enjoy fast-paced narrative and cool action scenes – read this book immediately. However, if you like reading science fiction and think about ethical themes and philosophy, I would not recommend reading this book. Check out The Three-Body Problem by Cixin Liu instead.

by Ilya Kabirov

Sue Monk Kidd Inspires Literary Vacation

s The Invention of Wings sparked a multi-generational adventure to Charleston, South Carolina.

After reading The Invention of Wings by Sue Monk Kidd I became obsessed with learning as much as I could about the sisters Grimke.  Although the book was historical fiction, Sarah and Angelina Grimke are more than just characters in a book, they were true abolitionists and suffragettes, and not surprising were daughters of true American patriots.  Their father was once jailed in Charleston by the British and the girls eventually had to leave Charleston in fear for their lives, never to return for the sake of their family.   After finishing my research I felt the need to visit Charleston and see some of the places that were so vividly described in the book.  Having also read the books, I invited two of my Aunts and one of my Daughters to go along with me on this pilgrimage.  Before our trip I contacted Carol Ezell-Gilson, part of the Charleston Preservation Society, who, along with a partner, leads the Original Grimke Sisters Tours.  We were not disappointed. Carol led us through Charleston, bringing us to the home that Sarah lived as a young girl, the home they moved to before Angelina was born, by the (most likely) home of Denmark Vecey, a free black carpenter and minister who led the opposition of Slavery in Charleston in 1822 and many other relevant landmarks.  She helped us discern the differences of fact and fiction in the book and helped us understand the city during the early 1800’s in such a special way. a

The book, written in two voices, the first being Sarah Grimke and the second being Hattie (Handful), her slave, gives life and breath to what it might feel like to live in the South during a turbulent time when people were so divided about right and wrong.  Having three generations of women following a path forged by the strength of two sisters was a powerful experience, building a bond I will cherish forever.

 

By Kathy Bennett
Children’s Services Associate

Great Reads Book Club – June’s Book

 

21853621In a video book trailer for The Nightingale, Kristin Hannah called it her personal favorite out of the books she had written. A veteran of romance genre, Hannah captivated her old readers and gained many new fans in the historical fiction genre after The Nightingale’s publication. The novel won many prestigious awards, such as the Goodreads Choice Award in 2015 and Library Journal’s Best Historical Fiction Award, but even more importantly, Kristin Hannah’s take on the Nazi-occupied France enthralled everyone in the Great Reads Book Club.

Hannah mentioned in one of her interviews that the idea for The Nightingale came to her several years ago while she was in a process of doing research for her other book, Winter Garden, which was set in Russia during World War II. While reading women’s war stories and diaries, Hannah came across the true story of a 19-year-old Belgian woman who created an escape route out of Nazi-occupied France. Her name was Andrée De Jongh and her story inspired The Nightingale.

When the Wehrmacht troops entered and occupied France in 1940, they broke the spirit of the French people with scare tactics, malnourishment, and at times, outright savagery. Albeit their cruel actions weakened the French population both physically and mentally, many fought back by joining together in what became known as the French Resistance. Our protagonists, sisters Isabelle and Vianne, fought back against the Nazi occupation in their own ways. The courage and sacrifice these sisters displayed in the novel honors the real French men and women, who experienced tremendous suffering during that time period.

My favorite aspect of The Nightingale was the gradual transformation of Isabelle and Vianne. In the beginning of the novel, we find out that they were driven apart by unhealed childhood wounds and divergent personalities. Isabelle is rebellious and not afraid to express her true feelings, even in the face of certain harm and danger. Vianne’s main source of anxiety is the safety of her daughter in the face of German occupation and, therefore, she tries to follow the rules. The Great War transforms the sisters and, while driving them apart initially, ultimately brings them closer together. If you enjoy courageous, dynamic, three-dimensional characters and seeing what actions they would take when facing tremendous ordeals, The Nightingale is the book for you. Hannah writes in a compelling and emotionally-moving way and it’s truly hard to put this one down.

Ilya Kabirov