Once upon a Crime: Mystery

Who doesn’t love a good mystery novel? I’ll be the first to admit that I tend to favor mysterious fiction with content others may deem dark or disturbing, but that doesn’t mean it’s not worth reading. In fact, that might be the exact reason literature of this sort is worth seeing through to the end. After all, what one reader considers dark or disturbing, another might find beautiful, hopeful, and moving.

Here’s a couple that are joining my book self:

  1. Into The Water by Paula Hawkins

Into the Water (5/2/2017)
by Paula Hawkins

“With the same propulsive writing and acute understanding of human instincts that captivated millions of readers around the world in her explosive debut thriller, The Girl on the Train, Paula Hawkins delivers an urgent, twisting, deeply satisfying read that hinges on the deceptiveness of emotion and memory, as well as the devastating ways that the past can reach a long arm into the present.” – Goodreads

2. Little Deaths by Emma Flint

Little Deaths (1/17/17)
by Emma Flint

“Inspired by a true story, Little Deaths, like celebrated novels by Sarah Waters and Megan Abbot, is compelling literary crime fiction that explores the capacity for good and evil in us all.” – Goodreads

3. See What I have Done by Sarah Schmidt

See What I Have Done(8/1/17)
by Sarah Schmidt

“In this riveting debut novel, See What I Have Done, Sarah Schmidt recasts one of the most fascinating murder cases of all time into an intimate story of a volatile household and a family devoid of love.” – Goodreads

4. Silent Child by Sarah A. Denzil

silentchild

“This dark and disturbing psychological novel will appeal to fans of The Widow and The Butterfly Garden.” – Goodreads

Don’t miss out on these great crime reads! Visit Fountaindale.org and place a copy on hold!

-DR

 

 

 

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Stay Forever Young with YA Lit!

Hello, book lovers!

Are you an adult who loves to read Young Adult literature? Or wanting to dive into a new genre known for its diversity, beautiful writing, and innovative stories? The Forever Young Adult Book Club has a new meeting night! Join us on Monday, September 11 at 7 PM in the Local History room to talk about your favorite YA literature! We also now have a Meetup group on Meetup.com where you can stay up-to-date on our meetings.

Here is a little bit about each of our upcoming featured books for the fall!

September 11
Enchanted Air by Margarita Engle
Poetry memoir

enchanted-air

Margarita is a girl from two worlds. Her heart lies in Cuba, her mother’s tropical island country, a place so lush with vibrant life that it seems like a fairy tale kingdom. But most of the time she lives in Los Angeles, lonely in the noisy city and dreaming of the summers when she can take a plane through the enchanted air to her beloved island. Words and images are her constant companions, friendly and comforting when the children at school are not. Then a revolution breaks out in Cuba. Margarita fears for her far-away family. When the hostility between Cuba and the United States erupts at the Bay of Pigs Invasion, Margarita’s worlds collide in the worst way possible. How can the two countries she loves hate each other so much? And will she ever get to visit her beautiful island again? In this poetic memoir, Margarita Engle, the first Latina woman to receive a Newbery Honor, tells of growing up as a child of two cultures during the Cold War. –Goodreads

October 9
And the Trees Crept In by Dawn Kurtagich
Horror

And the Trees Crept In

When Silla and Nori arrive at their aunt’s home, it’s immediately clear that the manor is cursed. The endless creaking of the house at night and the eerie stillness of the woods surrounding them would be enough of a sign, but there are secrets too—questions that Silla can’t ignore: Why does it seem that, ever since they arrived, the trees have been creeping closer? Who is the beautiful boy who’s appeared from the woods? And who is the tall man with no eyes who Nori plays with in the basement at night… a man no one else can see? –Goodreads

November 13
Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Sáenz
Contemporary fiction

Aristotle_and_Dante_Discover_the_Secrets_of_the_Universe

Aristotle is an angry teen with a brother in prison. Dante is a know-it-all who has an unusual way of looking at the world. When the two meet at the swimming pool, they seem to have nothing in common. But as the loners start spending time together, they discover that they share a special friendship—the kind that changes lives and lasts a lifetime. And it is through this friendship that Ari and Dante will learn the most important truths about themselves and the kind of people they want to be. –Goodreads

December 11
Kill the Boy Band by Goldy Moldavsky
Contemporary fiction

Kill the boy band

Four fan-girls of The Ruperts, sneak away to a hotel in Manhattan to see their favorite boy band, but when one of them literally drags Rupert Pierpont to their room and they tie him up, things get complicated–and when Rupert is killed things go from bad to worse.

Hope to see you there!

-ES

“There is no frigate like a book”: Travel Reads!

There is no Frigate like a Book
To take us Lands away
Nor any Coursers like a Page
Of prancing Poetry –
This Traverse may the poorest take
Without oppress of Toll –
How frugal is the Chariot
That bears the Human Soul –

-Emily Dickinson

Are you traveling this summer? Or wishing you were traveling this summer? Or knowing that summer is soon coming to a close and want to prolong its awesomeness? Maybe you want some books to accompany you on your journey or some books to take you away while you sit in your comfy chair from home. Well, there’s nothing like a good book to take you to new places! Try these out if you are looking to get away!

Walking the Amazon: 860 Days – One Step at a Time by Ed Stafford (2012)

Walking the Amazon
“From the star of Discovery Channel’s Naked and Marooned comes a a riveting, adventurous account of one man’s history-making journey along the entire length of the Amazon—and through the most bio-diverse habitat on Earth.” -Amazon

No Baggage: A Minimalist Tale of Love and Wandering by Clara Bensen (2016)

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“Newly recovered from a quarter-life meltdown, Clara Bensen decided to test her comeback by signing up for an online dating account. She never expected to meet Jeff, a wildly energetic university professor with a reputation for bucking convention. They barely know each other’s last names when they agree to set out on a risky travel experiment spanning eight countries and three weeks. The catch? No hotel reservations, no plans, and best of all, no baggage.” – Amazon

The Lost Girls: Three Friends, Four Continents, One Unconventional Detour Around the World by Jennifer Baggett (2010)

the-lost-girls-

“Three friends, each on the brink of a quarter-life crisis, make a pact to quit their high pressure New York City media jobs and leave behind their friends, boyfriends, and everything familiar to embark on a year-long backpacking adventure around the world.” -Amazon

Jasmine and Fire: A Bittersweet Year in Beirut by Salma Abdelnour (2012)

Jasmine and Fire

“As Beirut exploded with the bombs and violence of a ruthless civil war in the ’80s, a nine-year-old Salma Abdelnour and her family fled Lebanon to start a new life in the States. Ever since then — even as she built a thriving career as a food and travel writer in New York City — Salma has had a hunch that Beirut was still her home. She kept dreaming of moving back — and finally decided to do it. But could she resume her life in Beirut, so many years after her family moved away? Could she, or anyone for that matter, ever really go home again?” -Amazon

Honeymoon with my Brother: A Memoir by Franz Wisner (2005)

Honeymoon with my Brother

“This is the true story of Franz Wisner, a man who thought he had it all- a high profile career and the fiancée of his dreams – when suddenly, his life turned upside down. Just days before they were to be married, his fiancée called off the wedding. Luckily, his large support network of family and friends wouldn’t let him succumb to his misery. They decided Franz should have a wedding and a honeymoon anyway – there just wouldn’t be a bride at the ceremony, and Franz’ travel companion would be his brother, Kurt.” -Amazon

Italian Ways: On and Off the Rails from Milan to Palermo by Tim Parks (2013)

Italian Ways

“Parks begins as any traveler might: “A train is a train is a train, isn’t it?” But soon he turns his novelist’s eye to the details, and as he journeys through majestic Milano Centrale station or on the newest high-speed rail line, he delivers a uniquely insightful portrait of Italy. Through memorable encounters with ordinary Italians―conductors and ticket collectors, priests and prostitutes, scholars and lovers, gypsies and immigrants―Parks captures what makes Italian life distinctive: an obsession with speed but an acceptance of slower, older ways; a blind eye toward brutal architecture amid grand monuments; and an undying love of a good argument and the perfect cappuccino.” -Amazon

Visit Fountaindale.org to put your copy on hold! Looking for more? Stop by the 3rd Floor Reference Desk to ask our librarians for recommendations!

-ES

6 Ways to Find Your Next Read!

Sometimes finding a good book to read can be an overwhelming task – there are hundreds of thousands of books published in the United States every year, and so many more existing classics and little-known treasures that you might not know where to begin. But fear not, dear readers; I am here to give you some tips on ways to find that perfect book.

1. NoveList

As a Fountaindale card holder, you have access to an excellent reader database called NoveList Plus. NoveList allows you to search for books based on your reading interests. You can search by genre, setting, characters, themes, moods, you name it! NoveList will also provide you with “read-alikes” that suggest similar titles to ones you may have enjoyed in the past. It’s pretty much the ultimate reader resource. You can access it from our website under our “Find It! -> Online Resources” page and log in using your library card number!

Where to find NoveList on Fountaindale.org
Click on “NoveList Plus”
NoveList home page
NoveList home page

 

2. NextReads Newsletter

Fountaindale has a newsletter service that anyone can sign up for called NextReads! If you want recommendations delivered to your email, sign up either on the Fountaindale home page, or through our online catalog! You can choose from a number of different genres, and NextReads will send you lists of books that might just include your new favorite!

NextReads on home page
On the home page
NextReads in the catalog
In the catalog
NextReads newsletter signup
NextReads genres

 

3. What Should I Read Next?

Yes, there is literally a website called WhatshouldIreadnext.com! All you have to do is type in an author or book you enjoyed, and the site will generate a list of recommendations! How cool is that??

What Should I Read Next home page
WhatShouldIReadNext home page

 

4. Genrify Genre Blender

The genre blender on Genrify is a really neat tool that allows you to blend up 3 different genres to show you books that fit that description. Looking for a fantasy-romance? How about a historical-science-fiction-mystery? This will find it!

genre blender
Genre Blender home page

 

5. Social media

Check out my post about social media sites for readers! Goodreads, Litsty, and LibraryThing are just some of the cool sites to connect with other readers and get great recommendations! (Yes, this is also a shameless plug for my other posts.)

 

6. Ask a librarian!

I know this might come as a shock, but the internet might not always be able to find you what you want. Sometimes a human touch is needed to get just the right personal recommendation. After all, each reader is different, and talking it out with a librarian is often the best way to find just the right book! Stop by the 3rd floor reference desk sometime to talk books – we kinda like them.

-ES

7 Reasons Adults Should Read YA

Hey, readers! Did you know Fountaindale started a book club for adults who love Young Adult literature? Well, now you do! Our book clubs page has all the info you need to get involved, be you a Hunger Games fanatic, John Green buff, or Rainbow Rowell fangirl.

There are so many great reasons why adults love to read YA, but here are 7 of them, in case you want to get started yourself, or in case you just need a reminder of how awesome YA is!

1. Beautiful writing

Although you may not find complex Dickensian or stark Hemingway-an(?) writing, you will find some of the most poetic and quotable prose out there at the moment. There’s no wonder people keep making posters of YA quotes to hang on their walls. It’s just so beautiful!

John Green love quote
Source

2. Diverse characters

Diversity is growing by leaps and bounds in literature, and honestly, it’s the YA genre that’s leading the way. From LGBTQ+ reads to Black Lives Matter-inspired books, YA has taken great strides to represent historically underrepresented characters in literature.

3. SO. MANY. GENRES.

YA lit is a category of literature geared towards young adult audiences, and that’s literally the only requirement for a book to be YA. That means each and every genre is represented within YA: sci-fi, fantasy, romance, horror, historical fiction, realistic fiction, urban fiction – you name it, there is something for EVERYBODY.

books-colorful-harry-potter

4. Innovation

Some of the most innovative books I have read are in the YA genre. Most YA authors don’t feel the need to conform to any set of literary rules, so they are free to experiment with form and genre as much as they want. For example, some YA books, like Winter Town and I Am Princess X, are fusions of novels and graphic novels together. Others, like The Illuminae Files, are stories told in non-narrative formats: try a sci-fi epic written purely as a case file of emails, IMS, security reports, and court records. Genius!

Illuminae pages
From Illuminae by Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff

5. No fear

Despite being written for younger people, YA books tackle hard-hitting issues. YA is not afraid to address sexual abuse, depression, etc., and YA books grapple with the harshness of life while remaining accessible to a younger audience. So if you like serious issues, but don’t like the way adult literature portrays them, YA might be a better fit!

6. Freshness

If you’re looking for fresh new voices, YA is full of them. It’s also just great to stay up-to-date with what the young’ins are into these days.

YA Books Teen Zone
Source

7. Just plain fun

Seriously. YA books can be quite the page-turners. They can be exciting, hilarious, or heart-wrenching, and sometimes all 3 in one. If you start, you’ll only want more.

7030239035_624c94268a
Source

So what are you waiting for??

-ES

Current Staff Reads: April 2017

So what do library workers actually read? Here in Adult and Teen Services, we have a wide range of tastes and interests, so I thought it would be fun to highlight what some of us are currently reading at the moment. Who knows, this might become a regular thing on the blog! Let’s begin.

Brian:

Amazing Journey: The Life of Pete Townshend by Mark Wilkerson

Amazing Journey: The Life of Pete Townshend by Mark Wilkerson

This is Brian’s current read. As you can tell from the title, it’s about the life of Pete Townshend, the lead guitarist of The Who. Brian is enjoying this book because of its candid descriptions and snippets of insider info that he didn’t know before. (And Brian knows a lot about music, so that’s saying something!)

Jessica:

The Art of Racing in the Rain by Garth Stein

The Art of Racing in the Rain by Garth Stein

Jessica is reading The Art of Racing in the Rain, which is a fictional book narrated by a dog! Jessica says she’s enjoying it – she says it’s a bit sad, but that the dog is very smart and she likes that it is the dog who is telling the story.

Maureen:

The Chaperone by Laura Moriarty

The Chaperone by Laura Moriarty

Maureen just started reading this book for the Coffee and Conversion book club at Fountaindale! If you’re into 1920s history, this might be the novel for you.

Deyanira:

Game of Thrones

A Game of Thrones by George R.R. Martin

Deyanira is reading Game of Thrones! She says she’s really enjoying it because each chapter is written from a different characters’ perspective. She also likes how it seems very seeped in both history and fantasy.  We just told her not to get too attached to any of the characters…

Emily:

In the Country We Love

In the Country We Love: My Family Divided by Diane Guerrero

I’m reading In the Country We Love, which is a memoir written by Diane Guerrero, who is famous for starring in the shows “Orange is the New Black” and “Jane the Virgin.” She talks about being the daughter of undocumented immigrant parents who were deported when she was fourteen. It’s really good!

Hope you enjoyed seeing what some of our staff is reading! What’s on your reading list right now?

-ES

National Poetry Month

poetry

 

April is National Poetry Month.  Introduced in 1996 and organized by the Academy of American Poets, National Poetry Month is a celebration of poetry as a way to increase awareness and appreciation of poetry in the United States. The Academy of American Poets’ website Poets.org serves as a hub for information about local poetry events during the month. The organization also provides free educational resources for teachers in classroom celebrations and activities, and also commissions an annual festival poster.  The Fountaindale Public Library is proud to present this month’s lobby tree display in celebration of National Poetry Month with a plethora of books to choose from as well as a smattering of DVDs and CDs that take a look at all aspects of this unique and wonderful art form.

 

poetry2

 

Here is a sampling of some of the titles that await you:

  1. The American Night by Jim Morrison
  2. Complete Poems 1904-1962 by e. e. cummings
  3. Ghost Tantras by Michael McClure
  4. The Roominghouse Madrigals by Charles Bukowski
  5. The Scripture of the Golden Eternity by Jack Kerouac

 

…And, it’s all conveniently located for you on the 1st Floor, right when you first walk in!

poetry3

 

So, come on in and celebrate the art as well as the poets who have contributed immensely to the creative foundation of Poetry.

-Brian